Position Announcement: Chief Financial Officer – New York City

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS POSITION HAS CLOSED

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

New York City

OUR CLIENT COMPANY

Our client is the world’s leading designer, manufacturer and distributor of specialty flooring products. Sales are to a diverse range of domestic and international markets including oil, gas, mining and construction, special events, stadiums and arenas, sporting and athletic facilities, convention centers and general commercial.

The company is headquartered in New York City with a several distribution facilities across the U.S., a UK based subsidiary and a manufacturing facility in Florida. The client company is owned by a private equity sponsor that makes control investments in growing middle market companies and acquired its interest in the company in 2013.

RESPONSIBILITIES

The Chief Financial Officer will be a key contributor to the ongoing success of the business. As a member of the executive management team, the CFO will work closely with the President, the Private Equity Sponsor and other executive managers.

Responsibilities will be broad based and will include providing financial leadership, driving financial performance and overseeing financial reporting, planning and compliance.

The CFO will have day to day management responsibilities for the finance, accounting, and credit and collections functions, and will participate in developing strategies to drive domestic and global growth.

Key responsibilities include:

Participate and provide leadership as a key member of the Executive Leadership Team. The CFO will be responsible for contributing to the strategy, execution and continued improvement of the business through the implementation of appropriate policies, programs, metrics, and reporting. He/she must work effectively with the operating team consisting of sales, marketing, operations, IT, HR, procurement and quality.

Upgrade the effectiveness of the Accounting and Finance function. Enhance a business minded, proactive accounting and finance function that views itself as a partner in managing and growing the business. This includes coaching and mentoring team members as well as re-positioning and re-designing roles and responsibilities, as needed.

Coordinate and manage the audit process with the company’s outside auditors.

Provide meaningful financial reporting. The CFO should provide clear, concise, timely financial reporting to senior management and the Board of Directors and prepare effective management presentations focusing on key success factors — i.e., being able to “tell the story behind the numbers.” This will include driving the implementation of a new ERP system within the first year in the role.

COMPANY CULTURE

Our client has a 15-year track record of rapid growth propelled by a sales-oriented, entrepreneurial culture and a down-to-earth, open, collegial, non-bureaucratic work atmosphere.

“We’re a team of high-energy individuals who try hard not to take ourselves too seriously, but who take our shared mission of growing the business every day very seriously.”

In this key executive role, we’re looking for someone who not only has outstanding financial management skills and acumen, but who will also embrace and thrive in our culture — someone who will bring added metrics and process-disciplines to our organization while relishing and becoming part of the “roll-up-your-sleeves” culture that has driven us to this point in our growth story.

IDEAL CANDIDATE PROFILE

15 years of experience with progressive responsibilities leading to managing the entire financial management organization of a middle-market company.

Representative experiences would likely include:

  • CFO role in private equity backed business through an exit is highly preferred
  • Considerable experience in growth-oriented manufacturing and distribution environments, including managing commodity inputs
  • Experience in companies of varied sizes and scopes, from start-ups to turn-arounds to small/mid-market to Fortune-500
  • Enjoys “getting under the hood,” developing and managing the accounting and finance function from the day-to-day to the strategic, without large staffs
  • A systems thinker with experience leading ERP selection and implementation processes
  • Experience working with sales and operations internationally, handling multiple foreign currencies and funds repatriation
  • Management of working capital and debt reduction with a leveraged balance sheet
  • Product line and customer profitability analysis and enhancement
  • Acquisition experience with due diligence, planning and integration
  • Insurance, and risk management responsibility

Qualifications

  • 5+ years’ experience in CFO role
  • BA/BS required; MBA a plus
  • CPA a plus but not required. Need not be an accounting technician, but needs to be able to demonstrate command of the issues
  • Must reside within a reasonable commuting distance of the company’s headquarters in New York City

Personal Characteristics

  • Someone who understands vision and strategy but is also a hands-on leader who can get things done
  • Collaborative working style while willing to confront peers with resilience and tact for the betterment of the organization
  • Hands on, “doer” who does not rely on large staff to get things done but who delegates appropriately to available resources
  • Talented leader, coach, and mentor – teaches as he/she works with their team and other departments
  • Highly effective communication and presentation skills with the ability to clearly and concisely articulate issues to management and the board
  • High energy, sharp, results-oriented; capable of quickly establishing himself/herself as a credible strategic business partner and member of senior management
  • An individual of unquestioned personal and business integrity who will be viewed as trustworthy both within the company as well as with external constituents

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS POSITION HAS CLOSED

Resume with salary history to dp@sawyertms.com.  Please send resume in word format if possible and include salary history. There is no relocation offered for this position for please consider your location before sending your resume. All responses will be held in strictest confidence. Visit http://www.SawyerTMS.com to learn more about our firm.

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Visit skillsforum.net for their latest webinar schedule.

 

Announcing SkillsForum.net

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The training and development first stop for organizations and individuals alike.

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We deliver world class training solutions via Seminars, Webinars, One-on-One coaching sessions, and a variety of Special Events tailored to your needs.
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Materials will follow the general guidelines of professional development & workforce solutions, jobseeker support, and personal growth.

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Email us for more information at sales@skillsforum.net.

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Position announcement: VP Sales w Upstream Oil & Gas buyer contacts

Position Announcement

VP Sales with extensive mid big Upstream Oil & Gas buyer contacts

Immediate need   HOUSTON 

This position is well suited to someone who has been calling on buyers at upstream O&G drilling contractors. If you are coming from pumps, valves, oil field supplies, services etc this position will be a good fit.

My client’s high quality products are made in the Southeast US and are very well received in the marketplace. There is a solid growth plan and strong management team in place.  

Must be able to travel and international business development track record in helpful.

US based candidates only. Houston based position. Competitive compensation. Excellent growth and earnings opportunity.

Resumes with salary requirements immediately to dp@sawyertms.com .

Lots more detail when we talk.

More about us at www.sawyertms.com

Cheers!

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  • Contact Douglas L. Pilarski,  at dp@sawyertms.com with your comments!
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  • Get our firm profile or schedule time to talk by visiting www.sawyertms.com

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The 50 largest corporations in Brasil

Here is a list of the 50 largest corporations in Brasil

Brasil, officially the Federative Republic of Brazil (PortugueseRepública Federativa do Brasil,  is the largest country in both South America and the Latin American region. It is the world’s fifth largest country, both by geographical area and by population. It is the largest Lusophone country in the world, and the only one in the Americas.

Rank

Company City/State Business Field

1

Petrobras Rio de Janeiro, RJ Petroleum and Energy

2

BR Distribuidora Rio de Janeiro, RJ Wholesale (fuel)

3

Telemar Rio de Janeiro, RJ Telecommunications

4

Telefonica São Paulo, SP Telecommunications

5

Ambev São Paulo, SP Beer and drinks

6

Ipiranga Rio de Janeiro, RJ Wholesale (Fuel)

7

Volkswagen São Bernardo, SP Automobiles

8

Shell Rio de Janeiro, RJ Wholesale (Fuel)

9

General Motors São Caetano, SP Automobiles

10

Brasil Telecom Brasilia, DF Telecommunications

11

Bunge Food Gaspar, SC Food and Drink

12

Pão de Açucar São Paulo, SP Retailer

13

Vale do Rio Doce Rio de Janeiro, RJ Mining

14

Carrefour São Paulo, SP Retailer

15

Brasken Camaçari, BA Petrochemical

16

Esso Rio de Janeiro, RJ Wholesale (Fuel)

17

Texaco Rio de Janeiro, RJ Wholesale (Fuel)

18

Embratel Rio de Janeiro, RJ Telecommunication

19

Cargill São Paulo, SP Food and Drink

20

Eletropaulo São Paulo, SP Utilities (Electricity)

21

Nestle São Paulo, SP Food and Drink

22

FIAT Betim, MG Automobiles

23

CEMIG Belo Horizonte Utilities (Electricity)

24

C.S.N. Rio de Janeiro, RJ Iron and Steel

25

VARIG Porto Alegre, RS Transportation (air carrier)

26

Unilever São Paulo, SP Pharmacy and Hygiene

27

Souza Cruz Rio de Janeiro, RJ Tobacco

28

Embraer São José Campos, SP Airplanes

29

Gerdau Porto Alegre, RS Iron and Steel

30

Usiminas Belo Horizonte, MG Iron and Steel

31

Itaipu Brasilia, DF Utilities (Electricity)

32

REFAP Canoas, RS Petrochemical

33

Casas Bahia São Caetano do Sul, SP Retailer

34

AGIP São Paulo, SP Utilities

35

Correios Brasília, DF Postal Service

36

DaimlerChrysler São Bernardo, SP Automobiles

37

Sadia Concórdia, SC Food

38

Light Rio de Janeiro, RJ Utilities (Electricity)

39

Copesul Triunfo, RS Petrochemical

40

Ford São Bernardo, SP Automobiles

41

Vivo São Paulo, SP Telecommunications

42

Furnas Rio de Janeiro, RJ Utilities (Electricity)

43

Bunge Fertilizers São Paulo, SP Fertilizers

44

CPFL Campinas, SP Utilities (Electricity)

45

Cosipa São Paulo, SP Iron and Steel

46

Nokia Manaus, AM Electronics

47

Sabesp São Paulo, SP Utilities (Water & Sewage)

48

Perdigão São Paulo, SP Food

49

Basf São Bernardo, SP Chemicals

50

Copersucar São Paulo, SP Wholesale (sugar & alcohol)

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List of EMEA countries

EMEA means  Europe, Middle East, and Africa. It is commonly used in business as a way to convey service coverage or locate an office for a particular business. I have received a lot of comments from readers saying they have never heard of terms like MENA or EMEA or did hear but had no idea what the letters stood for. It is a surprisingly long list!

Here is a list of the countries included when you see the term EMEA.

Europe – Albania , Andorra , Armenia , Austria , Azerbaijan , Belarus , Belgium , Bosnia and Herzegovina , Bulgaria , Croatia , Cyprus , Czech Republic , Denmark , Estonia , Faroe Islands , Finland , France , France, Metropolitan , Georgia , Germany , Gibraltar , Greece , Greenland , Hungary , Iceland , Ireland , Italy , Kazakhstan , Kyrgyzstan , Latvia , Liechtenstein , Lithuania , Luxembourg , Macedonia , Malta , Moldova , Monaco , Netherlands , Norway , Poland , Portugal , Romania , Russian Federation , San Marino , Serbia and Montenegro , Slovakia , Slovenia , Spain , Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands , Sweden , Switzerland , Tajikistan , Turkey , Turkmenistan , Ukraine , United Kingdom , Uzbekistan , Vatican.

Africa –  Algeria , Angola , Benin , Botswana , Bouvet Island , Burkina Faso , Burundi , Cameroon , Cape Verde , Central African Republic , Chad , Comoros , Congo , Congo, Democratic Republic , Cote d’Ivoire , Djibouti , Egypt , Equatorial Guinea , Eritrea , Ethiopia, Gabon , Gambia , Ghana , Guinea , Guinea-Bissau , Kenya , Lesotho , Liberia , Libya , Madagascar , Malawi , Mali , Mauritania , Mauritius , Mayotte , Morocco , Mozambique , Namibia , Niger , Nigeria , Oman , Rwanda , Sao Tome and Principe , Senegal , Seychelles , Sierra Leone , Somalia , South Africa , Swaziland , Tanzania , Togo , Tunisia , Uganda , Western Sahara , Zambia , Zimbabwe.

Middle East  – Bahrain , British Indian Ocean Territory , Iran , Iraq , Israel , Jordan , Kuwait , Lebanon , Palestinian Territory , Qatar , Reunion , Saudi Arabia , United Arab Emirates , Yemen.

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Prohibited employment policies and practices

Prohibited Employment Policies/Practices

Under the laws enforced by EEOC, it is illegal to discriminate against someone (applicant or employee) because of that person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to retaliate against a person because he or she complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

The law forbids discrimination in every aspect of employment.

The laws enforced by EEOC prohibit an employer or other covered entity from using neutral employment policies and practices that have a disproportionately negative effect on applicants or employees of a particular race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), or national origin, or on an individual with a disability or class of individuals with disabilities, if the polices or practices at issue are not job-related and necessary to the operation of the business. The laws enforced by EEOC also prohibit an employer from using neutral employment policies and practices that have a disproportionately negative impact on applicants or employees age 40 or older, if the policies or practices at issue are not based on a reasonable factor other than age.

Job Advertisements

It is illegal for an employer to publish a job advertisement that shows a preference for or discourages someone from applying for a job because of his or her race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

For example, a help-wanted ad that seeks “females” or “recent college graduates” may discourage men and people over 40 from applying and may violate the law.

Recruitment

It is also illegal for an employer to recruit new employees in a way that discriminates against them because of their race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

For example, an employer’s reliance on word-of-mouth recruitment by its mostly Hispanic work force may violate the law if the result is that almost all new hires are Hispanic.

Application & Hiring

It is illegal for an employer to discriminate against a job applicant because of his or her race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. For example, an employer may not refuse to give employment applications to people of a certain race.

An employer may not base hiring decisions on stereotypes and assumptions about a person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

If an employer requires job applicants to take a test, the test must be necessary and related to the job and the employer may not exclude people of a particular race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, or individuals with disabilities. In addition, the employer may not use a test that excludes applicants age 40 or older if the test is not based on a reasonable factor other than age.

If a job applicant with a disability needs an accommodation (such as a sign language interpreter) to apply for a job, the employer is required to provide the accommodation, so long as the accommodation does not cause the employer significant difficulty or expense.

Job Referrals

It is illegal for an employer, employment agency or union to take into account a person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information when making decisions about job referrals.

Job Assignments & Promotions

It is illegal for an employer to make decisions about job assignments and promotions based on an employee’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. For example, an employer may not give preference to employees of a certain race when making shift assignments and may not segregate employees of a particular national origin from other employees or from customers.

An employer may not base assignment and promotion decisions on stereotypes and assumptions about a person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

If an employer requires employees to take a test before making decisions about assignments or promotions, the test may not exclude people of a particular race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), or national origin, or individuals with disabilities, unless the employer can show that the test is necessary and related to the job. In addition, the employer may not use a test that excludes employees age 40 or older if the test is not based on a reasonable factor other than age.

Pay And Benefits

It is illegal for an employer to discriminate against an employee in the payment of wages or employee benefits on the bases of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. Employee benefits include sick and vacation leave, insurance, access to overtime as well as overtime pay, and retirement programs. For example, an employer many not pay Hispanic workers less than African-American workers because of their national origin, and men and women in the same workplace must be given equal pay for equal work.

In some situations, an employer may be allowed to reduce some employee benefits for older workers, but only if the cost of providing the reduced benefits is the same as the cost of providing benefits to younger workers.

Discipline & Discharge

An employer may not take into account a person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information when making decisions about discipline or discharge. For example, if two employees commit a similar offense, an employer many not discipline them differently because of their race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

When deciding which employees will be laid off, an employer may not choose the oldest workers because of their age.

Employers also may not discriminate when deciding which workers to recall after a layoff.

Employment References

It is illegal for an employer to give a negative or false employment reference (or refuse to give a reference) because of a person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

Reasonable Accommodation & Disability

The law requires that an employer provide reasonable accommodation to an employee or job applicant with a disability, unless doing so would cause significant difficulty or expense for the employer.

A reasonable accommodation is any change in the workplace (or in the ways things are usually done) to help a person with a disability apply for a job, perform the duties of a job, or enjoy the benefits and privileges of employment.

Reasonable accommodation might include, for example, providing a ramp for a wheelchair user or providing a reader or interpreter for a blind or deaf employee or applicant.

Reasonable Accommodation & Religion

The law requires an employer to reasonably accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs or practices, unless doing so would cause difficulty or expense for the employer. This means an employer may have to make reasonable adjustments at work that will allow the employee to practice his or her religion, such as allowing an employee to voluntarily swap shifts with a co- worker so that he or she can attend religious services.

Training & Apprenticeship Programs

It is illegal for a training or apprenticeship program to discriminate on the bases of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. For example, an employer may not deny training opportunities to African-American employees because of their race.

In some situations, an employer may be allowed to set age limits for participation in an apprenticeship program.

Harassment

It is illegal to harass an employee because of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

It is also illegal to harass someone because they have complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

Harassment can take the form of slurs, graffiti, offensive or derogatory comments, or other verbal or physical conduct. Sexual harassment (including unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other conduct of a sexual nature) is also unlawful. Although the law does not prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal if it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or if it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted).

The harasser can be the victim’s supervisor, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer.

Harassment outside of the workplace may also be illegal if there is a link with the workplace. For example, if a supervisor harasses an employee while driving the employee to a meeting.

Terms & Conditions Of Employment

The law makes it illegal for an employer to make any employment decision because of a person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. That means an employer may not discriminate when it comes to such things as hiring, firing, promotions, and pay. It also means an employer may not discriminate, for example, when granting breaks, approving leave, assigning work stations, or setting any other term or condition of employment – however small.

Pre-Employment Inquiries (General)

As a general rule, the information obtained and requested through the pre-employment process should be limited to those essential for determining if a person is qualified for the job; whereas, information regarding race, sex, national origin, age, and religion are irrelevant in such determinations.

Employers are explicitly prohibited from making pre-employment inquiries about disability.

Although state and federal equal opportunity laws do not clearly forbid employers from making pre-employment inquiries that relate to, or disproportionately screen out members based on race, color, sex, national origin, religion, or age, such inquiries may be used as evidence of an employer’s intent to discriminate unless the questions asked can be justified by some business purpose.

Therefore, inquiries about organizations, clubs, societies, and lodges of which an applicant may be a member or any other questions, which may indicate the applicant’s race, sex, national origin, disability status, age, religion, color or ancestry if answered, should generally be avoided.

Similarly, employers should not ask for a photograph of an applicant. If needed for identification purposes, a photograph may be obtained after an offer of employment is made and accepted.

Pre-Employment Inquiries and:

  • Race
  • Height & Weight
  • Credit Rating Or Economic Status
  • Religious Affiliation Or Beliefs
  • Citizenship
  • Marital Status, Number Of Children
  • Gender
  • Arrest & Conviction
  • Security/Background Checks For Certain Religious Or Ethnic Groups
  • Disability
  • Medical Questions & Examinations

Dress Code

In general, an employer may establish a dress code which applies to all employees or employees within certain job categories.  However, there are a few possible exceptions.

While an employer may require all workers to follow a uniform dress code even if the dress code conflicts with some workers’ ethnic beliefs or practices, a dress code must not treat some employees less favorably because of their national origin.  For example, a dress code that prohibits certain kinds of ethnic dress, such as traditional African or East Indian attire, but otherwise permits casual dress would treat some employees less favorably because of their national origin.

Moreover, if the dress code conflicts with an employee’s religious practices and the employee requests an accommodation, the employer must modify the dress code or permit an exception to the dress code unless doing so would result in undue hardship.

Similarly, if an employee requests an accommodation to the dress code because of his disability, the employer must modify the dress code or permit an exception to the dress code, unless doing so would result in undue hardship.

Constructive Discharge/Forced To Resign

Discriminatory practices under the laws EEOC enforces also include constructive discharge or forcing an employee to resign by making the work environment so intolerable a reasonable person would not be able to stay.

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Senior level sales executive with extensive Oil & Gas buyer contacts

Senior level sales executive with extensive Oil & Gas buyer contacts

Immediate need.

Senior level sales executive with extensive Oil & Gas buyer contacts for Oil Field Supply sales position. Significant track record in big ticket selling.

US based candidates only.

Resumes with salary requirements immediately to dp@sawyertms.com.

More about us at http://www.sawyertms.com

Cheers!

Contact Sawyer TMS